IP Outreach Research > IP Crime

Reference

Title: Informe sobre consumo de productos falsificados
Author: [Ipsos - Mora y Araujo]
Source:

Argentina Original
http://www.argentinaoriginal.org.ar/sala_de_prensa/gacetillas/Presentacion%20MA.pdf

Year: 2006

Details

Subject/Type: Counterfeiting, Piracy
Focus: Apparel and Shoes, Beverages, Film, Food Products, Music, Personal Care Products, Software, Toys, Watches
Country/Territory: Argentina
Objective: To measure the consumption of counterfeits and to evaluate attitudes towards them.
Sample: 640 Buenos Aires metropolitan area residents, aged 16 to 70; 1.200 persons all over Argentina, aged 18 to 70
Methodology: At home interviews

Main Findings

66% of Metropolitan Buenos Aires residents buy at least “seldom” from street vendors. The most popular counterfeits acquired via such street vendors are: clothes (with 60% buying them), followed by shoes (47%), CDs (32%), and food/beverages (29%). 86% think that they can at least “sometimes” distinguish between genuine product and fake (10% affirm hardly ever/never be able to do so).

The price of a pirated product is usually less than half the price of the genuine counterpart (according to 63% of counterfeit buyers). When asked whether they would buy a CD they want if offered by a street vendor, then 57% would buy an illegal copy in the street for less than half the price of the original. 33% would not buy the pirated version when offered to do so.


66% of Argentinean residents buy at least “seldom” from street vendors. 84% think that they can at least “sometimes” distinguish between genuine product and fake (just 8% affirm hardly ever/never be able to do so). 67% agree that buying counterfeits is an illegal act, while 25% do not believe that this constitutes an illegal act.

The price of a pirated product is usually less than half the price of the genuine counterpart (according to 58% of counterfeit buyers). When asked whether they would buy a CD they want if offered by a street vendor, then 49% would buy an illegal copy in the street for less than half the price of the original. 39% would not buy the pirated version when offered to do so.

52% agree that counterfeiting hurts big brands that as a consequence invest less and generate less employment (36% disagree); 59% agree that buying fakes deprives the government of revenues it could spend for health, education or housing (30% disagree).

The probability of buying fakes decreases as age increases (86% of 18 to 29 year olds buy counterfeits, while just 41% of 60+ year olds do so). Members of all socio-economic strata buy counterfeits; however, the more privileged strata are somewhat less likely to purchase counterfeits.

[Date Added: Jan 20, 2009 ]